homemade sore muscle soak

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We helped my mom move into a new home today. I love my mom, but she is a few boxes short of an episode of Hoarders: Buried Alive. I’m not sure that she has fully realized yet that she moved into a smaller house with what amounts to almost 3 households worth of stuff. I was overwhelmed looking at all of it, but thanks to a house full of friends, neighbours and relatives, we were able to make some sense of a few rooms. At least we were able to set up the kitchen, living room, bathroom and bedroom for them. There are still 3 bedrooms, a storage room, a laundry room, a full basement and a garage full of stuff to deal with. Plus there are still several truckloads in storage.

Today was another reminder of the benefit of being a good neighbour – you have people willing to help you when you need it.

Because of my MS, I get sore easily, and though I know I should stop before that happens, it sometimes takes my body longer than it should to tell me when enough is enough. So tonight I am sore. But I did have all the ingredients on hand to mix up some sore muscle soak, so there is ibuprophen and a hot bath in my future.

The soak is a combination of a few recipes out there (like most of my recipes are) and contains epsom salts (helps to reduce inflammation, relieve aches and pains from muscle cramps, works as a muscle relaxer, helps remove toxins from your body and is apparently a natural emollient for your skin), sea salt (helps remove lactic acid build up that occurs in sore muscles) and baking soda (softens water and apparently helps you absorb the epsom salt).

I also add 3 drops each of eucalyptus and rosemary to the bath. Eucalyptus for purifying, oxygenating and energizing and rosemary for detoxifying, energizing and uplifting. Or so they claim. I like the way they smell.

I might repeat this again tomorrow night, after being dressing room mom to a group of 20 6-10 year olds for the ice skating Carnival tomorrow. That’s 4 changes of costume, each requiring removal and retying of skates. Did I mention there are 20 of them? And 3 moms.

Homemade Sore Muscle Bath Soak

  • 1 Cup Epsom Salts
  • 1/4 Cup Sea Salts
  • 1/4 Cup Baking Soda
  • 3 drops each of eucalyptus essential oil and rosemary essential oil

Mix together in a small bowl, fill bathtub with hot water and put the salt mixture in under the faucet as it is filling. Soak for at least 20 minutes, preferably with some music, a good book and the door locked so that small kids can’t enter. If you are anything like me, you will be ready to pour yourself into bed immediately afterward.

Linking to Frugally Sustainable, Six Sister’s Stuff, Natasha in Oz, Our Simple Farm, I {heart} Naptime, A Pinch of Joy, Sorta Crunchy

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32 thoughts on “homemade sore muscle soak

  1. We must have been separated at birth because it sounds like we have the same mother! :-) I’m keeping this “recipe” because I always have these ingredients on hand…and almost always sore muscles. :-) Thanks!

  2. saradraws says:

    This would be really useful at our house. And looks easy to make. My kind of recipe. Thanks!

  3. This sounds so relaxing! I have everything except the essential oils. I have a rosemary bush just outside our front door though so I could just throw in a couple bruised sprigs. I love the smell of rosemary. My two year old must too as he just ran out the front door! Gotta go!

    • Theresa says:

      If you want the purest essential oils, go to http://www.doterra.com They are the best!!!
      I use them every day. I am going to try this recipe since I injured my shoulder during a
      fall and my legs get a bit sore after a few hours of clogging practice.

  4. I’m not sore but that bath sounds lovely. Maybe I should just say I’m sore…

  5. Lynne Ayers says:

    I like to take a soak, often for sore muscles – I’m making note of this – thanks for posting it.

  6. Shira says:

    I LIVE for epsom salts baths but I think the additions are amazing! I AM making this…more good reasons to enjoy a luxurious bath. This is just great!

  7. i routinely make the dry ingredient mix, it lasts 3 baths for me…and i also like to use rosemary leaves in baths, foot baths, sprains, bruises, and also for potpourri. for the air cleansing, virus and bacterial overload, molds and mildews, house cleaning…
    i hope to grow a bush here in the upper Midwest if against a south facing wall with winter cover..
    i hope you can find a big yard sale sign for your mom..and throw a neighborhood yard sale party when done..good job on the girls and the move..

  8. Six Sisters says:

    What a great post! Thanks for linking up with Strut Your Stuff Saturday. We’re hoping you will join us again next week with more great ideas! – The Sisters

  9. [...] of nice hot bath for a soak by the end of it. This is what I came up with – it’s essentially my sore muscle soak with one [...]

  10. slowborg says:

    oooh yeah that sounds so good. I need it after a day massaging clients (if only I had a bath) but I can give this recipe to my clients as well!

  11. [...] post about using ginger in homemade beauty products. I modified her bath salts idea to use my sore muscle soak. I have to say that she’s a genious on the scent combination – it smelled absolutely [...]

  12. [...] chives with fresh dill from my pots out on the deck). Instead of traditional salt, I made up some sore muscle soak bath salts to include – she and her partner are always on the go, working hard, so I know someone will [...]

  13. Nice! I saw you on a list of favorite blogs so was intrigued. I’m Canadian,but have lived in the US most of my life. My younger sister has MS, but she finds baths far too draining. I’m glad you can benefit from this recipe. I love a good soak in an Epsom salt bath. I’ll have to try adding the other ingredients. Add a few lavender blossoms,put it in a bell jar, and you have the makings of a lovely gift.

  14. [...] essential oil and a couple of drops of peppermint oil (also a natural pain reliever) to the basic sore muscle soak that I have made before and added in some milk powder for an extra bit of luxury (it worked for [...]

  15. Cindy M. says:

    I have also added lemon balm leaves to mine. I love the smell.

  16. [...] Take an Epsom Salt Bath: Soak your sore, tired muscles and joints in a warm Epsom Salt Bath. You can even take it a step further and add in a few drops of your favorite essential oil. Here’s a link of an easy recipe for remedy bath. [...]

  17. Lai-Lai says:

    I’m allergic to eucalyptus. Is there a good substitute?

  18. Tracy Babin says:

    FYI…. Peppermint oil is also a muscle relaxant. Add a few drops to your bath and HEAVEN! Combine with what you’ve already got working… And you might never leave the bathtub! My husband is US Army vet who sustained injuries overseas, and he uses the peppermint oil baths to sooth his muscle spasms. In fact, when used 3 times a week, your muscle spasms will actually be reduced in severity and how often they occur. It’s been such a wonderful discovery for our family that I just had to share!

  19. Lisa says:

    I have MS and tend to over-do-it. I hope to use this recipe soon!

  20. salixisme says:

    Love this! The reason it works so well is because of the epsom salts – they are rich in magnesium salts, which are necessary for the muscles. Most people are chronically deficient in magnesium and that is why they get muscle pain…. an epsom salt bath helps because you can absorb this vital nutrient through the skin.

  21. Teeghan says:

    How long can this keep?

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